Celebrating New Year’s Eve in the Caribbean

Celebrating New Year’s Eve in the Caribbean

If you consider New Year’s a momentous event, you could hardly do better than to spend it in the Caribbean, dressed in your summer clothes, wandering the beaches and vibrant village streets while experiencing the island atmosphere — at once laidback and high-energy — building to a crescendo come December 31.

As you get busy planning your trip there, take note of some alternate phrasing: Caribbean locals refer to the occasion as “Old Year’s Night.” It's a twist on what Dick Clark and the throng of frigid folk in Times Square would say.

Suggesting a Caribbean getaway for New Year’s would be incomplete advice if it failed to include special guidance as to getting there. Certainly, you can rely on commercial airlines for transport into the general region of places like St. Barth, Anguilla, Nevis, and Antigua — all luxury landmarks within the Leeward Islands chain — but in this part of the world the last travel legs are the trickiest. Thus, the indispensable value of private air service via Tradewind Aviation, with its scheduled flights to the most desirable destinations within the storied archipelago.

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From a trio of hubs in Puerto Rico, Antigua, and the US Virgin Island of St. Thomas, Tradewind whisks its passengers on Swiss-built Pilatus PC-12 jet-prop aircraft, crewed by two pilots each and ultra-comfortable. The cabins are pressurized and air-conditioned, there’s plenty of luggage space, and the in-flight refreshments are complimentary, including wine and beer. If you’ve got a US passport and your itinerary pivots on San Juan, you’ll breeze through the customs and immigration process. Tradewind has a private airport lounge in San Juan, plus a VIP meet-greet option that ensures smooth transfers between flights. Luggage is also complimentary, and likewise your beloved pets are welcome at no charge.

The damage caused in 2017 by Hurricanes Irma and Maria has mostly been repaired, meanwhile this past storm season came and went without incident. Interestingly, the island of Nevis wasn’t affected at all by the twin tempests, nonetheless it’s the site of a major rebuilding and renovation project. Guests at the famed Four Seasons Resort Nevis, which always pulls out the stops to celebrate New Year’s, will arrive to find completely redesigned guestrooms, an updated Great House lobby, and two brand new restaurants.

Mixologists at the Four Seasons are known for selecting a special rum cocktail from their immense menu of them, as an official toast to the sun’s dip below the horizon on the big night. Caribbean vacationers have always been fixated on sunsets, no matter the season, but the last one of the year inspires particular devotion. Once that ceremony concludes, a Grand Tasting buffet rolls out, featuring every variety of gourmet fare, including caviar, king crab legs, lobster, and fine cuts of meat.

 Photo: Christian Horan, courtesy Four Seasons

Photo: Christian Horan, courtesy Four Seasons

On the famed French isle of St. Barth, New Year’s is synonymous with film stars, rock stars, and billionaire yachtsmen. Accommodations on a charter yacht are highly favored here, as well as rooms in the island’s many fine hotels — including Le Toiny, Le SerenoCheval Blanc, Hotel Christopher, and Le Barthélemy — all recently reopened or opening in December. Two of the newer luxury resorts, Villa Marie and Hotel Manapany, barely missed a beat after the hurricanes (having reopened in early 2018) and are all the more in demand.

One snug harbor on St. Barth, Port de Plaisance, becomes a New Year’s epicenter. The entire basin — dockside berths and anchor moorings alike — sparkles with seafaring works of art. Coming ashore, yacht guests prowl the nearby promenade with its designer boutiques and jewelry shops. When the night of champagne toasts and fireworks finally arrives, they parade along in a New Year’s Eve Regatta that your cellphone photos won’t do justice to.

While fireworks on New Year’s Eve may seem the sole reason to look upward, another Caribbean pleasure shouldn’t be forgotten — island stargazing, either on beachfronts or the open water. Short charter excursions on boats that make a specialty of leaving the ambient light behind and acting as docents for the starry dome are common in these islands. You should consider getting aboard one of them, binoculars in hand. For most US residents, the arrangement of stars and constellations across the winter sky may prove disorienting at first, with Polaris appearing much lower than one is used to and the three points of Orion’s belt poised considerably higher.

 Photo: Curtain Bluff

Photo: Curtain Bluff

Along with St. Barth and Nevis, the Tradewind route map also includes Anguilla, a British territory 16 miles long, and further down the chain to the southeast, Antigua with its rainforests, reef-lined beaches, and posh resorts.

One holiday enclave on Antigua that’s worth booking is Curtain Bluff, which drew raves for its $17-million renovation in 2017 and has continued making guest-pleasing improvements since. These include beautification of its one-bedroom Bluff Suites and redesign of its beachfront Seagrape restaurant. Service on the sand is available from an expanded Beach Concierge service. You’re stretched out on lounge chair, surrounded by turquoise waters, and staff members are bringing you a light lunch… yes, all that.

Of course, world-class relaxation can prompt an urge to get up and get moving. If you’re visiting Anguilla and you brought sturdy footwear, the famed hiking trails offer rugged beauty and fascinating bird life, including the magnificent frigatebird, with its sculpted wing profile against blue skies over famed Windward Point. New lodging options on Anguilla include the 65-room boutique hotel Zemi Beach House and the nine-room Quintessence Hotel, ultra-luxurious and exclusive.

A full-scale travel guide to New Year’s in the Caribbean would surely be book-length — these quick highlights are simply meant to inspire. No matter where your journey takes you, the islands present an unforgettable way to ring in 2019.

Featured Photo: Curtain Bluff

Anguilla Reborn: One Year After Irma

Anguilla Reborn: One Year After Irma

Amid white sands and ethereal blues, a walk on the beaches of Anguilla today won’t reveal the journey that the island has been through in the year since Hurricane Irma. The coastline looks as beautiful as ever, local beach bars have music playing, and the last of Anguilla’s luxury resorts are preparing to reopen for a new season.

When the powerful Category 5 storm passed over the Leeward Islands in September 2017, shorelines throughout the islands were decimated and entire homes and businesses collapsed. On Anguilla, where 14,000 people call the destination home year-round, residents suddenly found themselves without income in the aftermath of the hurricane as tourism completely shut down. But in disaster, the incredible spirit of the Anguillan people shone through.

 Photo: Belmond Cap Juluca

Photo: Belmond Cap Juluca

Families and neighbors began to help each other rebuild. The owner of Sunshine Shack, Garvey Lake, assisted another restaurant in picking up the pieces before turning to his own popular beach bar – where not a single piece of wood remained. On the island’s northwest coast, the owner of Viewfort Estate, Josephine Gumbs-Connor, established the Pure Anguilla Foundation to gather food and supplies for local families. And soon after the storm, four of Anguilla’s luxury properties and largest private employers came together to form Anguilla Stronger.

Barry Sternlict’s Starwood Capital Group, which owns Four Seasons Resort and Residences Anguilla, joined forces with Belmond Cap Juluca, Zemi Beach House, and Malliouhana to provide support to islanders while the resorts were undergoing repairs. Together, the nonprofit relief fund raised nearly $2 million to be used toward building materials and food and enlisted hundreds of volunteers to deliver supplies to the people on a weekly basis.

After months of rebuilding, Anguilla feels alive once more. Infrastructure has been repaired, local businesses are open, and the enthusiasm of the Anguillan people is ever-present. If you are returning to the island after having visited in the past, you will find your favorite resorts and restaurants revitalized and ready to welcome you back.

Luxury Resort Updates

 Photo: Zemi Beach House

Photo: Zemi Beach House

Zemi Beach House: Amid sweeping beaches and lush greenery, Anguilla brims with luxurious retreats like Zemi Beach House, the first high-end resort to reopen its doors after Irma. Set on six oceanfront acres on Shoal Bay East, Zemi boasts white-sand beaches (which were restored soon after the storm), alfresco dining, and holistic spa treatments in the revitalized rice barn that houses Zemi Thai House Spa.

Four Seasons Resort and Residences Anguilla: On the other side of the island, Four Seasons spans 3,200 feet of shoreline between Barnes Bay and Meads Bay. The retreat, which reopened in spring of 2018, features elegant villas, townhomes, and residences with gourmet kitchens and indoor-outdoor living spaces – many with private pools set high on the bluffs.

CuisinArt Golf Resort and Spa: Another favorite of luxury travelers, CuisinArt just reopened in November after a complete transformation. Along with redesigned interiors, you will find new dining concepts headed by Executive Chef Alan Larch, like the Moroccan-inspired KazBar and the much-anticipated Mosaic. Once you’re settled in, go for a round of golf on Greg Norman’s signature 18-hole championship course, then head to the spa where the restored hydroponic farm provides ingredients for a farm-to-spa program.

 Photo: Belmond Cap Juluca

Photo: Belmond Cap Juluca

Belmond Cap Juluca: Still to come on December 10 is the reopening of one of Anguilla’s most famous retreats. Recently rebranded under the Belmond name, Cap Juluca will debut a new beachfront infinity pool, restaurant concepts, a rustic beach bar, and a disappearing spa just steps from its elegant accommodations with sun-spotted terraces. 

Malliouhana: Malliouhana first opened 30 years ago on the edge of Meads Bay, and on December 15 the acclaimed resort will continue its 30-year legacy when it reopens with spacious new guestrooms, a sleek infinity pool, and a toes-in the sand beach bar. In March 2019, look for the unveiling of a new spa overlooking the Caribbean. 

The Culinary Capital of the Caribbean

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Anguila’s restaurants were quick to recover despite sustaining heavy damage. You can once again find Caribbean, Moroccan, and Asian flavors in the romantic, treehouse setting of Veya and delicious island specialties like tuna carpaccio at the acclaimed Jacala Beach Restaurant. Despite being completely destroyed during the storm, the quintessential Sunshine Shack reopened just a few months later with its recognizable red, yellow, and green bar on Rendezvous Bay. On the opposite end of the island, Falcon Nest beckons with blackened fish tacos, nachos, and fried oysters just steps from Anguilla’s blue waters.

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Tradewind Aviation offers convenient connection to Anguilla, with scheduled flights operating four days per week from San Juan and private charters available anytime from Puerto Rico, the USVI, Antigua, and the US mainland. Flight time from San Juan to Anguilla is just 45 minutes, and scheduled flights operate from December 14 through April 22.

Featured Photo: Zemi Beach House

Nantucket Bay Scallops: A Fisherman’s Tale

Nantucket Bay Scallops: A Fisherman’s Tale

It’s the night of October 31 on Nantucket Harbor. The ocean air is cool and the sun hours from rising, but island fishermen are already eagerly preparing to collect their bounty. Come 6:30 am the annual commercial harvest season of Nantucket Bay Scallops begins. And for five months, Nantucket’s fishermen brave the harsh conditions of late fall and winter for a share of the year’s takings.

One of those fishermen is island native Carl Sjolund, who has been scalloping in Nantucket’s bays for over half a century. Last year was a watershed year for Sjolund, who collected over 500 bushels (a standardized volume for scallops) during the previous season’s go-round. Considering the legal limit of five bushels per licensed fisherman per day (maximum two licensed fishermen per boat) and a penchant for fishing solo, Sjolund averaged four to five days per week reaping Nantucket’s prized fruits of the sea.

That’s even more impressive accounting for the challenges of icy waters, ever-changing sea conditions, declines in viable eel grass habitat (where bay scallops grow), and the sheer unpredictability of where baby scallops will take root. 

 Photo: Peter Morrison

Photo: Peter Morrison

“In general, it’s a crapshoot where we’ll find them around the island,” says Sjolund. “Every year is different. Last year, there were lots in the main Nantucket Harbor and between Madaket Harbor and Tuckernuck Island” – but that’s not necessarily an indication of where they’ll be found this season.

While Sjolund and his peers are busy scouting for and reeling in this year’s catch, nonprofit organization Nantucket Shellfish Association works with its constituents to ensure there will be a sufficient catch again next year. Once prolific in Nantucket’s waters, populations of bay scallops are now a fraction of not only last century but even the 1980s. Thanks to the Association’s environmental stewardship and actions, Nantucket now holds claim to “the world's oldest continually sustained wild bay scallop fishery.”

“Nantucket Bay Scallops used to be called Cape Scallops,” explains Sjolund. However, the commercial bay scallop fisheries in Marion, Brewster, Chatham — all along the northeast coast — were completely depleted. And then there was one.

It was a combination of overdevelopment, pollution, and overfishing that led to the demise of the Cape Scallop. Through prudent management and practice, Sjolund and the Nantucket Shellfish Association are working to abate these anthropogenic environmental challenges on Nantucket plus deal with new and unexpected threats like invasive black stringy algae, which has infested Nantucket waters in the past five years. 

 Photo: Leah Cabral

Photo: Leah Cabral

The Association is tackling scallop survivorship from the demand side, too, ensuring that Nantucket Bay Scallops are properly labeled and consumers educated so that imposters aren’t sold as the real deal. According to the Association, “There are many varieties of bay scallops, but none is as sought after by chefs and gourmands around the world as bay scallops from Nantucket.”

It’s like distinguishing champagne from other sparkling wines. So to ensure authenticity, the Nantucket Shellfish Association has trademarked the Nantucket Bay Scallop and labels all shipments with tags and stickers for legitimacy. While a busy Michelin-starred restaurant in New York City may not take the time to verify the bay scallops as such, restaurants on Nantucket will do so with pride.

Mother Nature may be the ultimate decision-maker on this commercial scallop season, but thanks to intelligible fishermen like Sjolund and proactive measures by the Nantucket Shellfish Association, we’re hopeful that Nantucket’s renowned shellfish will remain plentiful for generations to come.

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Tradewind operates daily shuttle flights to Nantucket from late April through early December, as well as private charter flights year-round. On the island, you will find seafood restaurants like SeaGrille open during the fall and winter, as well as Sayle’s Seafood market offering just-caught Nantucket Bay Scallops to take home.

A Caribbean Spa Getaway

A Caribbean Spa Getaway

Miles of idyllic beaches and an inescapable sense of calm have already given the Caribbean a reputation for attracting relaxation-minded travelers. Add luxury resorts brimming with innovative wellness therapies, and you have found the perfect place for your next spa retreat.

From the lush jungle of Nevis to the glamorous shores of St. Barth, here are eight of our favorite island spa sanctuaries open now. All are easily accessible when you fly Tradewind with regularly scheduled shuttles and private charters throughout the Caribbean.

Le Spa at Le Barthélemy

St. Barth

 Photo: Le Barthélemy

Photo: Le Barthélemy

Set on a pristine stretch of Grand Cul de Sac, the appropriately named Le Spa is a haven for holistic wellness that opened in 2016 when Le Barthélemy first debuted on the island. The beachfront retreat features an open-air atrium that invites the outdoors in as guests indulge in revitalizing facials, massages, and body treatments with La Mer products. Along with a signature rain shower, you can find a blow dry bar and nail bar with eco-friendly polishes.

Our Recommendation: Restore radiance to your skin with The La Mer Miracle Broth Facial, which includes a bespoke facial massage, a pure infusion of Miracle Broth, and an ice sequence.

The Spa at Four Seasons Resort and Residences Anguilla

Anguilla

 Photo: Four Seasons

Photo: Four Seasons

On the northwest shore of the island atop sweeping coastal bluffs, Four Seasons Resort and Residences Anguilla welcomes those seeking relaxation with a sleek infinity pool, oceanfront yoga classes, and truly personalized spa experiences. Step into an elegant seaside treatment room or take a breath of fresh salt air when you opt for a spa cabana. The innovative rituals here are inspired by nature, the elements, and cultures from around the world.

Our Recommendation: Detoxify your skin with an Anguilla Salt Scrub, using ingredients that are native to the island. Your experience includes a citrus vanilla mask, scalp and foot massage, and body wrap. 

The Palms Spa at Nisbet Plantation

Nevis

 Photo: Nisbet Plantation

Photo: Nisbet Plantation

Both serene and adventurous, Nevis is a paradise for travelers looking to balance mind, body, and spirit. In The Palms Spa at the historic Nisbet Plantation, pamper yourself with stress-melting treatments highlighting fresh fruit, spices, mud, and seaweed in an intimate setting. Spa Director Valencia Griffin will recommend indulgences like the signature Island Breeze Massage followed by a glass of champagne on the palm-lined patio.

Our Recommendation: Another favorite of the Spa Director, the Tropical Citrus & Honey Tonic Body Wrap features sweet tangerines, oranges, and island honey. Enjoy a gentle scrub, warm body tonic and wrap, scalp massage, and shea butter body massage.

Blue Spa at Carlisle Bay Antigua

Antigua

 Photo: Carlisle Bay Antigua

Photo: Carlisle Bay Antigua

Framed by pristine beaches and lush rainforest and gardens, Blue Spa at Carlisle Bay Antigua beckons with deeply relaxing treatments that use wild, organic, hand-harvested seaweed. The sanctuary on the southern shore of the island features West Indian massages, reiki, and more in a peaceful setting where gentle breezes come through the open plantation shutters.

Our Recommendation: A complete head-to-toe experience, the Rescue Me Ritual includes a scalp massage, exfoliation, stretching, and body massage using the world’s first organic seaweed oil with anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties.

Spa by CuisinArt

Anguilla

 Photo: CuisinArt Golf Resort and Spa

Photo: CuisinArt Golf Resort and Spa

With a renewed focus on whole-body wellness and biodynamic treatments, Spa by CuisinArt returns this season at the beautiful CuisinArt Golf Resort and Spa on Rendezvous Bay. A farm-to-spa program is powered by the resort’s hydroponic farm, with herb-infused scrubs and wraps made with ingredients directly from the farm. In the Healing Waters Pool, guests can enjoy hydrotherapy and restorative soaks in nutrient-rich mineralized saltwater, while an array of workshops provide opportunities to create custom scrubs and salts and to learn about specific areas of wellness like essential oils.

Our Recommendation: Rejuvenate your body with the Aqua Massage inspired by Anguilla’s crystalline waters. A therapist moves you through warm, healing saltwater using gentle massage and stretching techniques.

Spa Sisley at Hotel Christopher

St. Barth

 Photo: Max VanderNoot, courtesy Hotel Christopher

Photo: Max VanderNoot, courtesy Hotel Christopher

Discover Spa Sisley where the art of living well meets the ocean on St. Barth. The tranquil sanctuary on the island’s northern coast highlights Sisley Phyto-Aromatic Treatments known for their use of essential oils and plant extracts. Each treatment is inspired by rituals from all over the world and created with a respect for local traditions.

Our Recommendation: Schedule a Sisley After-Sun Ritual at the end of a beach day to enjoy both the Zen Harmony body treatment – a complete aromatic body massage designed for extreme relaxation and regeneration – and the After-Sun Facial for supple and radiant skin.

The Spa at Four Seasons Resort Nevis, West Indies

Nevis

 Photo: Four Seasons

Photo: Four Seasons

A tropical garden sanctuary, the spa at Four Seasons Resort Nevis brims with relaxing experiences, from Vinyasa and power yoga to a plunge pool with a volcanic stone waterfall. Among the many innovative treatments, the spa features rituals from the exclusive THÉMAÉ Paris that blend the antioxidant benefits of tea and spring water with modern technology. The benefits of Bush tea and homegrown remedies are ancient traditions on Nevis, and you won’t find THÉMAÉ treatments anywhere else in the Caribbean. 

Our Recommendation: For full-body exfoliation, choose the Coconut, Rum, and Brown Sugar Scrub using ingredients native to the West Indies. After your treatment, a complimentary Rum Cocktail awaits you at any of the resort bars.

The Jumby Bay Spa

Antigua

 Photo: Jumby Bay Island

Photo: Jumby Bay Island

On a 300-acre private island with four and a half miles of white-sand shoreline, The Jumby Bay Spa is a newly designed oasis by the sea. With a contemporary design, the space offers a shaded open-air relaxation lounge, plunge pool, ocean-view treatment rooms, and an expansive fitness and yoga pavilion. The treatments combine modern therapy with the ancient healing remedies of West Indies and African cultures, and each begins with a welcoming foot ritual. 

Our Recommendation: Antigua’s healers have historically regarded the pairing of hot and cold as a balance between the natural and supernatural worlds. In the Amerindian Healing Ritual, enjoy a full-body cleanse followed by a warm, herbal oil and then a cooling blend of aloe, peppermint, and menthol for complete balance.



Featured Photo: Carlisle Bay Antigua

St. Barth Gears Up for Fifth Annual Gourmet Festival

St. Barth Gears Up for Fifth Annual Gourmet Festival

The countdown has begun for the Caribbean’s most anticipated foodie fête: the St. Barth Gourmet Festival. From November 1 – 4, St. Barth’s top establishments will host an array of gastronomy-focused events, which showcase the culinary excellence of France’s leading chefs alongside the ingenuity of local talent.

Hurricane Irma may have forced the cancellation of last year’s festival, but the island has since been rebuilding to prepare for the 2018 – 2019 season, which kicks off with this event. So along with the fabulous multi-course wine-paired dinners, cooking competitions, and seminars, expect hefty sides of top-tier hotel and restaurant re-openings. Here, everything you need to know about the St. Barth Gourmet Festival — from star-studded events to must-see chef battles to where to stay.

Marquee Chefs Headline the Dinners at the St. Barth Gourmet Festival

 Photo: Michael Gramm

Photo: Michael Gramm

To be sure, St. Barth has its own roster of star chefs, but the St. Barth Gourmet Festival casts a spotlight on the global leaders of French gastronomy. Meaning France’s Michelin-starred elite descend upon the tropics come early November. 

Executive Chef Nicolas Sale of two-Michelin star restaurant La Table de L’Espadon at the Ritz Hotel in Paris leads the 2018 festival. He will be serving up delectable French cuisine at the newly renovated Le Barthélemy Hotel. Joining Sale for the weekend are other toques of Michelin-starred pedigree including Chef Cédric Béchade of La Table de l'Auberge Basque, who will be cooking at Tamarin, and Chef Édouard Loubet of Domaine de Capelongue, who will be cooking at Hotel Le Toiny. You can also find Chef Virginie Basselot at Hotel Christopher, Chef Pierre Augé at Nikki Beach, and Chef Serge Labrosse at Bonito.

Each will host three nights of ticketed dinners (the Friday, Saturday, and Sunday of the festival), during which patrons can enjoy a four-course menu or an eight-course menu. Reservations begin at 7 pm and can be made directly by contacting the hotel or restaurant host.

Daytime Events Are All About Competition

 Photo: Michael Gramm

Photo: Michael Gramm

During the days, the aforementioned top chefs alongside other French greats serve as juries to a series of competitions across the island. Don’t miss the largest event, “Le Concours de Barman” at 10 pm on Friday, November 2 at 25 Quarter in Gustavia. It’s the ultimate battle of island mixology, with St. Barth bartenders going head to head in creating original cocktail recipes.

A new addition this year is the “Joyfood Challenge” at Nikki Beach Restaurant on Saturday, November 3 starting at 10 am. Five local (amateur) cooking teams prepare and present their bespoke interpretation of “joyful food.” Expect a combination of praise and harsh critiques from the personality-driven panel.

You’ll need to wake up early on Sunday, November 4 to watch the most anticipated competition of the festival, “Le Concours St-Barth Chefs Challenge.” From 8 to 10 am, rising talents are challenged to create a dish that embodies "the island of St. Barthelemy." This cookoff, like all the daytime contests, is free and open to the public.

Major Re-Openings Will Be Timed With the Festival 

 Photo: Tourism Committee

Photo: Tourism Committee

While many of St. Barth’s premier villas proved a quick fix after Hurricane Irma, it has been a different story for the island’s hotels. Yet thirteen months later, significant progress has been made – with favorites like Manapany and Villa Marie having opened earlier this year – and this fall we can look forward to a few major re-debuts in time for the St. Barth Gourmet Festival.

Le Toiny reopens on October 15 bigger and better than ever; check out the new hillside Villa Suites and beachfront pool in between festival events. If you’re looking for a quiet escape on the island’s north shore, Hotel Christopher rejoins the luxury space on October 17 after renovating more than 70 percent of its structures. And for a completely personalized stay, check into Le Barthélemy (which had just debuted months before Irma) for upgraded rooms and custom amenities like a pillow menu. The resort on Grand Cul de Sac will be back in action by October 28.

Featured Photo: Michael Gramm

The Return of St. Barth’s Luxury Hotels

The Return of St. Barth’s Luxury Hotels

In the year since Hurricane Irma struck St. Barth, the island has made an extraordinary recovery. 

Beaches and hillsides once covered in debris now flourish amid restoration programs and the addition of more than 1,500 new trees and plants. Gustavia’s restaurants and shops were revitalized and reopened soon after the storm. And as St. Barth prepares to welcome visitors back for the high season, some of the island’s top hotels are ready to make their long-awaited debut.

Joining Manapany on Anse des Cayes bay and Villa Marie in the hills above Colombier (both of which opened earlier in the year after renovations), here are the hotels returning to St. Barth this season. All are easily accessible when you fly to the island on Tradewind’s scheduled and private flights.

Hotel Christopher

Reopening October 17

 Photo: Piter Juin

Photo: Piter Juin

Nestled along the northern coast of St. Barth, between the azure sea and Pointe Milou, Hotel Christopher is known for its intimate setting that feels both timeless and elegant.

With 70 percent of the hotel damaged during the storm – including the destruction of the beachfront restaurant – the team has spent the year renovating all 42 rooms and suites, updating Spa Sisley with a new fitness room and equipment, and relining the oceanfront infinity pool with eye-catching mosaics. Upon opening in the fall, revamped restaurants Taïno Lounge and Mango Beach Club will introduce new menus under the direction of Chef Nicolas Tissier.

Le Barthélemy Hotel

Reopening October 28

 Photo: Laurent Benoit

Photo: Laurent Benoit

Blending Parisian style with the laidback setting of St. Barth, Le Barthélemy Hotel is the newest luxury retreat on the island – having opened in 2016 on a pristine stretch of Grand Cul de Sac.

The bespoke hideaway has upgraded all accommodations since the storm (including the addition of a pillow menu for customized rest, signature scents, and distinct lighting options) and added new two- and three-bedroom beachfront suites. A late-night rooftop bar will offer live music and DJs on weekends, while the renowned Aux Amis plans to expand beyond the restaurant and onto the beach for lunch. Make sure to also check out the expanded Le Spa, where you can enjoy new hot and cold baths, a sauna, hammam, and a tea salon.

Cheval Blanc

Reopening Early December

 Photo: Mango PR

Photo: Mango PR

On the edge of Flamands Bay, Cheval Blanc will once again invite you into a lush garden with spectacular views of the Caribbean Sea. Inspired by the rhythm of island life, French designer Jacques Grange is leading the incredible redesign, orchestrating colors and textures in perfect vivid harmony to restore the Maison and hillside bungalows.

Thirty-four rooms, four one-bedroom suites, and two beachfront villas bathed in sunlight will debut for a soft opening in December alongside the revitalized Cheval Blanc Spa, The White Bar, La Canane de l’Isle, and the signature al fresco La Case de l’Isle by Chef Yann Vinsot.

Hotel Le Toiny

Reopening October 15

Tucked among the trees on a verdant hillside in Côte Sauvage, Hotel Le Toiny affords stunning vistas of the water below. The private and exclusive resort reopens next month with enhanced facilities and eight all-new suites designed by the acclaimed Bee Osborn.

Known for her residential designs in the United Kingdom and beyond, Osborn draws inspiration from classic interiors while infusing her work with modern energy and dynamic lighting. Her latest creations at Le Toiny include seven one-bedroom suites and a two-bedroom suite, each with a private terrace, ocean-view pool, and lush landscaping designed to offer guests a sense of quiet seclusion.

Le Sereno

Reopening December 1 

 Photo: Sereno Hotels

Photo: Sereno Hotels

Simplicity meets style at Le Sereno, an intimate beachfront resort on Grand Cul de Sac that spans 600 feet of pristine white sand. When the property reopens this winter, guests can expect an innovative new restaurant, completely redesigned rooms including new family suites with private pools, a new fitness facility, and an enhanced spa. Although most of the hotel will be new as a result of the storm, the spirit of Le Sereno – like the island – will remain the same.

Featured Photo: Sereno Hotels